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Copyright / Legal Info: All content posted on this website, including (published or non-published) videos and images shot at our facilities demonstrating our devices, is copyrighted and owned by Mirrorcle Technologies, Inc.; and is protected by United States and international copyright laws. Any unauthorized (without the express written permission of Mirrorcle Technologies) use, reproduction, alteration, and/or retransmission by any means of those materials is strictly prohibited and may result in legal action and financial liability.

Videos are also available on our YouTube channel, with slightly lower resolution and quality.


Mirrorcle Technologies at the Photonics West 2016 Exhibition

In February 2016, Mirrorcle Technologies, Inc. attended SPIE Photonics West show and conference in San Francisco, CA, where the company displayed newest products and demos.

 

 

 

Mirrorcle Technologies Celebrates Its 10th Anniversary at Photonics West 2015

In February 2015, Mirrorcle Technologies, Inc. celebrated 10 Years of Excellence since founding in Feb. 2005. This coincided with the SPIE Photonics West show and conference in San Francisco, CA, where the company displayed newest products and demos, and where Mirrorcle researchers presented results of recent R&D projects.

 

 

Laser Marking with Mirrorcle MEMS Mirrors

MirrorcleTech MEMS mirror can very precisely raster scan an image and using focused laser diodes print labels, images, or 2D barcodes on various materials. Vector graphics are shown as well, using MirrorcleDraw software. Printing can be at virtually any resolution and printing time is dependent on available laser power and material properties. In this simple demonstration a LaserScribe DVD is used as the target.

 

 

Fast and Compact MEMS Mirror Based Laser Tracker

Using Mirrorcle Technologies gimbal-less MEMS Mirrors, we designed and demonstrated various laser tracking systems, including a system for outdoor use at ~100m range. The systems use a scanned laser beam to follow and report the position of a remote object optically. The object is marked with a small retro-reflective tape marker. Position is then reported to the user. MEMS mirrors enable simple, compact, and low-cost implementation of laser tracking as well as drastically lower power consumption than competing technologies.

 

 

Mirrorcle Technologies MEMS Mirrors in Tip-Tilt-Piston Operation

Gimbal-less, 4-quadrant MEMS mirrors are typically used in tip-tilt (two-axis rotation) mode, for various optical beam-steering application. In this demonstration we operate three typical devices in 3 DoF (three degrees of freedom) mode, by also independently conrolling pistoning motion of the mirror (up and down).

 

 

MirrorcleTech 8.2mm and 9.0mm MEMS Mirror Scanning System

In 2012 we designed and fabricated the largest size gimbal-less MESM mirrors to date. To enable closed-loop control each unit includes an optical position detection module and a close-loop MEMS controller. Scanning System accepts setpoint commands for both axes by digital (SPI) or analog input, and communicates back position data.

 


Mirrorcle Technologies at the Photonics West 2013 Exhibition

A brief overview of the Mirrorcle Technologies booth at the Photonics West 2013 Exhibition in San Francisco, Feb. 5th-7th, 2013. Numerous demos of point-to-point MEMS mirrors are shown and explained. MEMS Mirror Development Kit hardware and software is shown. Demos include laser display on glass, Android app for MEMS mirror driving, a touch sensor frame which turns a piece of glass into an interactive laser display.

 

 

Printing of Labels and Images

MirrorcleTech MEMS mirror can very precisely raster scan an image and using focused laser diodes print labels, images, or 2D barcodes on various materials. Printing can be at any resolution and printing time is dependent on available laser power and material properties. In this simple demonstration a LaserScribe DVD is used as the target.

 

 

Video: MTI RGB Laser Projection Display I

Full-color Laser Projection Display
(01:12 | 30 MB)

Mobile projector with a MEMS-based scanning mirror, and miniature native-semiconductor RGB (Red, Green, Blue) laser sources. Demonstrates our technology for very light, low-power pocket (pico) projectors. This demo shows 1280x720 pixel images displayed using our MEMS projector demonstrator.


 

Video: MTI Tracking of Retroreflectors and Various Objects II

Optical 3D Tracking of a Corner-Cube Retroreflector
(01:08 | 39 MB)

Second part of a demonstration of optical 3D tracking based on MirrorcleTech scanning MEMS mirrors. The system is scanning a laser beam in a volume, until it finds a retro-reflective object which it detects with a photo-sensor. It is then capable of rapidly tracking that object through its 3D movements and precisely measuring its position. The object here is a prism-type corner-cube retroreflector which seems illuminated in red during tracking due to the fact that the MEMS mirror continually directs the laser beam toward its center.


 

Video: MTI Tracking of Retroreflectors and Various Objects I

Optical 3D Tracking of Objects Marked with Retroreflective Tape
(02:11 | 78 MB)

First part of a demonstration of optical 3D tracking based on MirrorcleTech scanning MEMS mirrors. The system is scanning a laser beam in a volume, until it finds a retro-reflective object which it detects with a photo-sensor. It is then capable of rapidly tracking that object through its 3D movements and precisely measuring its position. We use retro-reflective tape stickers to mark various objects to be tracked. Tape then seems illuminated in red during tracking due to the fact that the MEMS mirror continually directs the laser beam toward its center.


 

Video: MTI Optical 3D Tracking of a Light-Emitting Object

Optical Optical 3D Tracking of a Light-Emitting Object
(01:08 | 40 MB)

Demonstration of optical 3D tracking based on MirrorcleTech scanning MEMS mirrors. The system is scanning a mirror in a volume, until it finds a light-emitting object which it detects by reflecting its light to a photo-sensor. It is then capable of tracking that object through its 3D movements and precisely measuring its position.


 

Video: 3D Tracking and Position Measurement Demo

Mobile MEMS-Based Laser Projection Display
(02:44 | 42 MB)

Mobile battery-powered projector with a MEMS-based scanning mirror. Technology for very light, very low-power pocket (pico) projectors is demonstrated. This demo shows NTSC video (720x480) displayed using our MEMS projector demonstrator. Unit runs on a Li battery for 3.5+ hours.


 

Video: 3D Tracking and Position Measurement Demo

Glimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
3D Tracking and Position Measurement Demo
(02:01 | 34 MB)

3D Tracking - Two 4-quadrant devices track a photo-detector target in 3D space. As a result of the two separate relative position acquisitions, a real-world XYZ position measurement is possible, and the result is presented to the user in mm distance from a reference point between the devices. System performs position measurement with 16-bit precision in a 20 degree FOV cone at distances up to 10m.


 

Video: 3D Tracking and Vibration Measurement Demo

Glimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
Vibration Measurement with 3D Tracking Demo
(01:11 | 35 MB)

3D Tracking - Two 4-quadrant devices track a photo-detector target in 3D space. This target can be attached to remote equipment to monitor the amplitude and frequency of its vibrations. In this demo we track the motion of a scroll-saw. Check the "3D Tracking and Position Measurement Demo" movie for a better description of the system.


 

Video: Windshield Head-Up Display

Glimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
Windshield Head-Up Display
(01:13 | 17 MB)

Our fast dual-axis devices are used to display text and various vector graphics on a windshield of an automobile. The unit is placed 20cm from the windshield surface and has a 110 degree field-of-view, allowing it to display on most of the windshield surface. This is accomplished with the combination of our MEMS device and a wide-angle lens. In production, the display unit could fit into a 2x2x2 cm cube. Power consumption is low and dominated by the laser supply.


 

Video: Windshield Head-Up Display

Glimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
Device Control from a Web Interface and with a Wii Remote
(01:31 | 23 MB)

Around the clock there are two live on-line demos on our website. The second one, Live Demo 2, shown in this video, provides a microscope camera view at a dual-axis 4-Quadrant device which runs continuously. A simple web interface allows users to interact with this demo. In one specific mode we allow a user (in our lab only) with a Wii Remote to control the device angle wirelessly with acceleration input, i.e. with Wii Remote motion.


 

Video: MTI Transparent Vector Graphics Display Demo

Gimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
Transparent Vector Graphics Display Demo
(01:26 | 16 MB)

Transparent Display Demo - Turning a transparent glass window into a vector graphics display. Using MirrorcleDraw software to create vector graphics patterns, text, and displaying ILDA animations, the video demonstrates displaying on a transparent glass surface which is coated with a special film.


 

Vedio: MTI Large Micromirrors

Glimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
2mm+ Biggie Mirrors and 3mm+ Jumbo Mirrors

(01:11 | 6.1 MB)

Large Micromirrors - Latest actuators from ARIMEMS7 generation of devices provide bi-directional two-axis scanning. Largest mirrors to date in the 2mm diameter and the 3mm diameter range are mounted on the actuators and demonstrated.


To date, most generations of ARIMEMS micromirror devices provided 1-quadrant (uni-directional) scanning in two-axes, e.g. from 0° to 8° on each axis. In other words, mirror scans a laser beam only in one quadrant of the hemisphere above the chip. Most recent generation of devices includes two types of actuators shown in this video that allow 4-quadrant (bi-directional) scanning, e.g. -6° to 6° of mechanical tip/tilt on each axis.

Latest generation of ultra-lightweight micromirrors fabrication allows the use of large micromirrors in the 2mm diameter range ("Biggies,") and in the 3mm range ("Jumbos,") at relatively high scanning speeds. Above video is purposely recorded at very slow speed, with scanning driven by MirrorcleDraw software.

 

Video: MTI Projection Display I

Gimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
Laser Projection Display I
"MEMS VGA Monitor"

(01:14 | 21 MB)

Laser Projection Display II
"MEMS Movie Projector"

(01:03 | 17.6 MB)

MTI Projection Display II


MTI Two-axis scanning micromirrors trajectory can be specified to fill a raster pattern of e.g. 640x480 pixels, and with fast laser modulation a grayscale bitmap image or animation can be displayed. In these videos we are demonstrating micromirror devices capable of VGA and SVGA display. A D-SUB VGA display capable plugs into our demo unit in this video so that the signal a computer's 2nd monitor is fed to our MEMS projection-based laser display unit. The micromirror device is consuming less than 6mW of power, and the overall circuit (excluding laser power,) consumes up to 250mW.

The video is distored by the camera and subsequent MPG compression, but can still give a clear view of what is possible with MirrorcleTech's devices.

 

Video: MTI Trancking and Targeting Demo

Gimbal-less Two-Axis Micromirrors
Tracking and Targeting Demo

(01:21 | 7.0 MB)

TrackingDemo1 - Using video acquisition, system tracks the position of a red laser spot and directs a green laser beam to that spot with MTI's two-axis MEMS scanning micromirror.


We have also developed a PC-based MirrorcleTrack software, to control and drive MTI's gimbal-less two-axis micromirrors in connection with a video acquisition capability. The software firstly allows the user to acquire a 2-dimensional look-up table for the MEMS device, accurately mapping desired position on the display (wall) to required actuation voltages. This is done by monitoring the laser spot on the display with a video camera in a closed-loop acquisition mode. After the table of required voltages and positions is known, the device can be accurately directed to target a red laser spot that is seen inside of its display area.

Video also show the capability of the algorithm to ignore false-positive targets, whether they are spots of wrong color (another green laser,) or spots of wrong size (small red spot,) and to remain locked onto the primary target (large red spot.)

   
 

 

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